Dengue Fever Risks Analysis

Welcome to the Mosquito-borne Diseases exploration! This is one of the last round explorations of this school year 2017-2018 at Liger. We are a group of 12 students and a facilitator who is trying to study deeply about a very common mosquito-borne disease in Cambodia, Dengue Fever, that every Cambodian had heard of. Throughout the research, we had found that the number of Dengue Fever cases are doubled this year compared to the previous year. This information had encouraged us to pick this particular disease to focus on most. Currently in class, our teams are working on a project called ‘Risk Analysis’ where we have to survey villagers, analyze the data, and finally writing a report for the study ourselves.

The goal of this project is to estimate which village of the two are most likely to have a Dengue Fever outbreak in this upcoming raining season.

Mosquito larvae inside villager’s water storage.

We start off by creating a team to work on the questionnaire. The questionnaire will only include the relevant questions and are not expected to be a long list of the question due to the time limit; we don’t have much time to interview as well as to analyze responses of each question. There was also another team that is working on figuring out routes that each team or pairs will be taking in order to avoid interviewing the same households.

On May 18th and 19th, 2018, our team went out of campus to do surveys of our neighborhood villages: Champus Kaek, Koh Krobey, one household followed by the other. We spend approximately 20 minutes to interview each household. The six pairs complete about 60 household in that morning in Champus Kaek village and are ready to keep on the work to interview the next village tomorrow, expecting to have a sample survey of 52 at least. After the two days, we end up interview 116 household in total which was really impressive.

Interviewing one of the households.

My favorite part of the whole process is to be able to connect and feel the kindness and a warm welcoming from each person we’ve been walking through to interview them. They were really friendly in term of like respecting and letting some 15-year-old asking them questions. Getting the accurate answer from them is really important, so we have to make sure they are comfortable with telling us the information we need. I was glad to get to talk to and connect with all the villagers once again.

In the second village, Koh Krobey, we seem to run into an issue. Each route the group had divided doesn’t seem to share the same amount of household, so some group seems to struggle with completing the amount of survey they needed to get done with. I was also one of the groups who’s struggling. As I walk through the route, I try my best to ignore those dogs that were barking hard at us. After a few minutes, we make a decision to just meet up as a team and continue to interview the route with a lot of people which is another team route.

Observing one of the village’s water storage.

There were many flaws in making this report. There are a lot of different interviewers. So there’s a chance that we can interpret the question in a different way and receive a slightly inaccurate answer.

While analyzing the data, I was on a roll with the other three mates to work on analyzing the association between people’s behavior and their risk of getting dengue fever. Surprisingly, there isn’t any evidence of an association between them. This means that the risk of getting dengue fever is not influenced by their behavior.

One of the water storage type that many villagers had used.

Throughout this whole exploration, I had worked my hardest at all time! I asked a lot of questions and always pay all of my attention toward the lesson our facilitator had given us. Those questions had influenced my understanding of this topic very well. I had worked my best to connect all of the experiences from the last exploration like Surveying in Cambodia into writing the report. Lastly, I hope I had played my role well and had contributed every knowledge I have had toward making this project happen.

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